December 3, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Call with Uzbekistan Foreign Minister Kamilov

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy R. Sherman spoke today with Uzbekistan Foreign Minister Abdulaziz Kamilov. They discussed the situation in Afghanistan and the need for an inclusive political settlement that protects human rights. The Deputy Secretary thanked the Government of Uzbekistan for facilitating the repatriation of Americans and welcomed continued cooperation on the temporary relocation of vulnerable Afghans.

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