January 20, 2022

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Deputy Secretary McKeon to Highlight Importance of International Education, Foreign Affairs Careers at Indiana University

25 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Following his visit to Camp Atterbury in Indiana on December 1, 2021, Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources Brian P. McKeon will meet with students at Indiana University in Bloomington on December 1 and 2 to underscore the U.S. government’s commitment to international education as a foreign policy priority, as recently reiterated by Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and U.S. Secretary of Education Dr. Miguel Cardona in a Joint Statement of Principles in Support of International Education, and how international education can prepare students for careers in foreign affairs, particularly with the U.S. Department of State.

Deputy Secretary McKeon hosted a careers roundtable with Indiana University students on December 1, highlighting the State Department’s commitment to recruiting diverse and talented candidates for a variety of career tracks in the foreign and civil service.

On December 2, Deputy Secretary McKeon will meet with a small group of local students who are fellows or alumni of State Department exchange programs through the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, including the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program, Critical Language Scholarship Program, and Fulbright Program. This discussion will focus on how international education furthers U.S. foreign policy goals and how State Department exchange alumni can use the international skills and perspectives they gain abroad to pursue careers in foreign affairs, in particular with the U.S. Department of State. Deputy Secretary McKeon’s participation in these events at Indiana University will further the Department’s continued efforts to engage with diverse students on U.S foreign policy priorities and careers with the State Department.

For more information, contact PAPressDuty@state.gov.

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