December 4, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Biegun’s Travel to the Republic of Korea

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Office of the Spokesperson

Deputy Secretary of State and Special Representative for North Korea Stephen E. Biegun will travel to Seoul December 8-11.  He will meet with officials in the Republic of Korea to discuss the U.S.-ROK Alliance and our shared commitment to regional security, stability, and prosperity throughout the Indo-Pacific, and continued close coordination on North Korea.

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