December 4, 2021

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Deputy Assistant Attorney General and Counselor for International Affairs Bruce C. Swartz Statement Before the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control

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<div>Chairman Whitehouse, Co-Chairman Grassley, and distinguished members of the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control, thank you for this opportunity to testify on behalf of the Department of Justice. The topic of today’s hearing – the nexus between the illicit narcotics trade and corruption – is one of central importance to the Department of Justice.</div>
Chairman Whitehouse, Co-Chairman Grassley, and distinguished members of the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control, thank you for this opportunity to testify on behalf of the Department of Justice. The topic of today’s hearing – the nexus between the illicit narcotics trade and corruption – is one of central importance to the Department of Justice.

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