January 22, 2022

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Democratic Republic of the Congo Travel Advisory

12 min read

Reconsider travel to Democratic Republic of the Congo due to COVID-19, crime, and civil unrest. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Democratic Republic of the Congo due to COVID-19.  

Democratic Republic of the Congo has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Democratic Republic of the Congo. 

Do Not Travel To:

  • North Kivu and Ituri provinces due to terrorism.
  • The eastern DRC region and the three Kasai provinces (Kasai, Kasai-Oriental, Kasai-Central) due to crime, civil unrest, armed conflict, and kidnapping.
  • Équateur province due to Ebola.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as armed robbery, armed home invasion, and assault, is common and local police lack resources to respond effectively to serious crime. Assailants may pose as police or security agents.

Demonstrations are common in many cities and some have turned violent. Police have at times responded with heavy-handed tactics that resulted in civilian casualties and arrests.

The U.S. government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens outside of Kinshasa due to poor infrastructure and security conditions.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo:

North Kivu and Ituri Provinces–Do Not Travel

Terrorist and armed groups operating in North Kivu and Ituri provinces have attacked military and civilian targets and represent an ongoing threat to humanitarian aid workers and other NGO personnel operating in the area.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in North Kivu and Ituri provinces as U.S. government travel to these areas is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Eastern DRC Region and the Three Kasai Provinces–Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout North Kivu, South Kivu, Ituri, Tanganyika, Haut Lomami, Bas-Uele, and Haut-Uele and three Kasai provinces of Kasai Oriental, Kasai Central, and Kasai. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in eastern DRC and these provinces, as U.S. government travel to these regions is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Équateur Province– Do Not Travel

The province of Équateur is experiencing an Ebola virus outbreak, with confirmed and probable cases reported. The CDC issued a Level 2 Travel Notice for Ebola in DRC.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to the Level and COVID-19 information.

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