January 25, 2022

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Death of European Parliament President Sassoli

8 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

We send our deepest condolences to the people of the European Union on the passing of European Parliament President David Sassoli.  President Sassoli will be remembered as a strong supporter of the U.S.-EU partnership, a voice for democracy and human rights globally, and an advocate for a European Union that serves its citizens and is made stronger by its diversity.  Our thoughts are with his family and loved ones.

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