January 19, 2022

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Czech Republic National Day

10 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the people of the United States of America, I congratulate the Czech people and the Government of the Czech Republic as you celebrate the anniversary of the founding of the Czechoslovak state.

The United States and the Czech Republic share an enduring commitment to strengthening security, promoting economic development and democratic values, and defending human rights.  I witnessed firsthand the strength of our relationship, built on the foundation of these shared priorities, during my visit last August to Prague and Pilsen.

We look forward to continuing to partner with the Czech Republic as we respond to the global pandemic and confront malign influence.  Just as the United States supported democracy and sovereignty for the peoples of Czechoslovakia in 1918, we stand proudly today with the Czech people as friends, Allies, and partners.

 

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