January 27, 2022

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Counselor Brechbuhl’s Travel to Mexico, Panama, and Uruguay

9 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Department of State Counselor T. Ulrich Brechbuhl will travel to Mexico City, Mexico, Panama City, Panama, and Montevideo, Uruguay, October 6-9, 2020.

In Mexico, Counselor Brechbuhl will meet with Foreign Minister Ebrard to discuss Mexico’s continued commitment to addressing irregular migration, economic integration, and the need for Mexico to comply with its water treaty obligations.  The Counselor will also discuss combating transnational crime.

In Panama, Counselor Brechbuhl will meet with several Panama government officials to discuss U.S.-Panama cooperation in areas of COVID-19 assistance, investment, and efforts to combat money laundering.  Counselor Brechbuhl will also preside over a donation of 50 additional ventilators from the United States Agency for International Development to the people of Panama.

In Montevideo, Counselor Brechbuhl will meet with Chief of Staff to the President Alvaro Delgado and Foreign Minister Francisco Bustillo to discuss enhanced bilateral engagement, and opportunities to expand commercial relations and security cooperation.  The Counselor will also discuss the Foreign Minister’s upcoming trip to Washington.

This trip highlights the United States’ commitment to deepening bilateral relations, promoting economic prosperity, and continuing bilateral cooperation on migration and security issues in the region.

 

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