December 3, 2021

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COPS Office Announces Funding to Combat Illegal Opioids and Methamphetamine

14 min read
<div>The Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) announced today $44.5 million in funding to support state-level law enforcement agencies in combating the illegal manufacturing and distribution of methamphetamine, heroin and prescription opioids. </div>
The Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) announced today $44.5 million in funding to support state-level law enforcement agencies in combating the illegal manufacturing and distribution of methamphetamine, heroin and prescription opioids. 

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