January 22, 2022

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Conviction of Three Members of the Independent Journalists Association of Vietnam

13 min read

Cale Brown, Principal Deputy Spokesperson

The United States is deeply concerned to learn of Vietnam’s conviction and sentencing of three members of the Independent Journalists Association of Vietnam, Pham Chi Dung, Nguyen Tuong Thuy, and Le Huu Minh Tuan, to 15, 11, and 11 years in prison respectively.

These harsh sentences are the latest in a troubling and accelerating trend of arrests and convictions of Vietnamese citizens exercising rights enshrined in Vietnam’s constitution.  The United States calls on the Vietnamese authorities to release all those unjustly detained and to allow all individuals in Vietnam to express their views freely, without fear of retaliation.  We urge the Vietnamese government to ensure its actions are consistent with the human rights provisions of Vietnam’s constitution and its international obligations and commitments.

Press freedom is fundamental to transparency and accountable governance.  Authors, bloggers, and journalists often do their work at great risk, and we urge governments and citizens worldwide to ensure their protection.

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