January 29, 2022

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Condolences on the Passing of Prime Minister Ambrose Dlamini of the Kingdom of Eswatini 

10 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I offer the people of the Kingdom of Eswatini our heartfelt condolences on the passing of Prime Minister Ambrose Dlamini.  He has been a steadfast partner with the United States in working to combat the scourge of HIV, encourage good governance, strengthen a market-based economy, defend human rights, and raise up women, youth, and other disadvantaged groups in society.  The United States stands with the people of Eswatini during this period of mourning.

More from: Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

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