December 9, 2021

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Condemning the Houthis’ Disregard for Civilian Protection and Humanitarian Access in Abdiya, Yemen

6 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States condemns the Houthi escalation around Marib, which demonstrates a flagrant disregard for the safety of civilians.  The Houthis are obstructing movement of people and humanitarian aid, preventing essential services from reaching the 35,000 residents of Abdiya. Their actions add to an already dire humanitarian situation and have caused even more Yemenis to become internally displaced. The United States urges the Houthis to immediately permit safe passage for civilians, life-saving aid, and the wounded. As the UN stated this week, it stands ready with its partners to provide this much needed assistance to the people of Marib.

We call on the Houthis to stop their offensive on Marib, and listen to the urgent calls from across Yemen and the international community to bring this conflict to an end and support a UN-led inclusive peace process.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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