January 25, 2022

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Condemning ISIS-K Attack on a Kabul Gathering

13 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States condemns in the strongest terms today’s despicable ISIS-K attack on a Kabul gathering held to commemorate a revered Shiite martyr.  Attacking the innocent and defenseless at a memorial event is a sign of weakness, not a show of strength.  Our thoughts are with victims and their families, as well as the brave Afghan security forces who defended against the terrorists.

The Afghan people deserve a future free from terror.  The ongoing Afghan Peace Process presents a critical opportunity for Afghans to come together to build a united front against the menace of ISIS.

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