January 27, 2022

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Comoros National Day

6 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I congratulate the people of Comoros on the occasion of your independence.

The United States values our relationship with the Union of Comoros, which has endured for more than forty years and has advanced many shared priorities such as improving education, enhancing maritime security, and addressing climate change. We look forward to many more years of collaboration in promoting a safe and secure Indian Ocean.

As Comoros celebrates its independence, we extend our best wishes for a healthy and prosperous year ahead.

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