January 25, 2022

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Chile Travel Advisory

12 min read

Reconsider travel to Chile due to COVID-19.  Exercise increased caution in Chile due to civil unrest.   

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Chile due to COVID-19.     

Travelers to Chile may experience border closures, airport closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within Chile due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Chile.

Exercise increased caution in Chile due to civil unrest. Read the entire Travel Advisory and Travel Alerts.

There have been large-scale demonstrations in Santiago and other major cities in Chile.  Demonstrations can take place with little or no notice.  Many protests occur with little regard for public safety, and have resulted in property damage, looting, arson, and transportation disruptions.  Local authorities have used water cannons and tear gas to disrupt protests.

The government-imposed State of Emergency was lifted on October 28, 2019.  The State of Emergency included curfews in multiple cities, which were enforced by police and the armed forces. While the State of Emergency was lifted, there continue to be conflicts between protestors and Chilean police in Santiago and other cities in Chile. You should remain vigilant, monitor local media for updates and avoid protests and demonstrations.

Expect disruptions to transportation, particularly in Santiago. The Santiago Metro is operating with limited hours, and service has yet to be restored to the entire network. Road blockages on highways and major thoroughfares may occur with little warning. You should contact your airline prior to travel for any information on potential flight delays.

Many shopping malls, banks, supermarkets, and restaurants may be operating with reduced working hours, particularly in the evening.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Chile:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Avoid demonstrations.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities including movement restrictions and obey all curfews.
  • Find a safe location, and shelter in place if in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Monitor local media and local transportations sites (buses, Metro, and airport) for updates and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the US Embassy and  Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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