January 20, 2022

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Chad Travel Advisory

6 min read

Reconsider travel to Chad due to COVID-19, crime, terrorism, and minefields.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Chad due to COVID-19.  

 Chad has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Chad.    

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as armed robbery, carjacking, and muggings, have been reported.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreigners, local security forces, and civilians.  They can easily cross borders, including in the Lake Chad region; borders may close without notice.

There are unmapped and undocumented minefields along the borders with both Libya and Sudan.

The U.S. Government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Chad as U.S. Government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside of the capital, including the Lake Chad Basin.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Chad:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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