January 24, 2022

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Central African Republic National Day

4 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States and the American people, I congratulate the people and government of the Central African Republic as you celebrate your national day.

Over the last year, our two nations have worked to build the foundation for a more secure, healthy, and prosperous future for all Central Africans.  From the signing of agreements to reinforce our development and security partnerships, to our mutual efforts to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have collaborated in a spirit of transparency and accountability. We are committed to continuing to make progress towards our shared objective of a peaceful and thriving Central African Republic.

As you celebrate this important day, I extend best wishes to all Central Africans.

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