December 9, 2021

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Cambodia Travel Advisory

14 min read

Exercise increased caution in Cambodia due to COVID-19.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for Cambodia due to COVID-19.

Cambodia has resumed most transportation options and business operations. Other improved conditions have been reported within Cambodia. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Cambodia.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • Phnom Penh due to crime.
  • Very remote areas of Battambang, Banteay Meanchey, Pursat, Siem Reap, Pailin, and Kampong Thom provinces due to land mines.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Cambodia:

Phnom Penh

Street crime, particularly phone and bag snatchings, occurs frequently in areas where foreigners gather; resistance can result in injury. We urge all travelers to be aware of their surroundings at all time and to be extra vigilant when displaying items like jewelry, bags and cell phones in public. Violent crime, such as sexual assault and homicide, is common, sometimes against foreigners.

Do not physically resist any robbery attempt. Use caution when walking or driving at night.

Battambang, Banteay Meanchey, Pursat, Siem Reap, Pailin, and Kampong Thom provinces

Land mines and unexploded ordnance are found in very remote areas throughout Cambodia, and especially in Battambang, Banteay Meanchey, Pursat, Siem Reap, Pailin, and Kampong Thom provinces.

Do not touch unknown metal objects; instead notify the Cambodia Mine Action Center at 012-800-473/023-995-437. Use a local guide when walking in forested areas or dry rice paddies in these areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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