January 20, 2022

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Botswana Travel Advisory

9 min read

Reconsider travel to Botswana due to COVID-19

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.    

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Botswana due to COVID-19.  

Botswana has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Masks are required in all public spaces. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Botswana.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Botswana:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.                                                                         

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