January 26, 2022

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Belize Travel Advisory

10 min read

Do not travel to Belize due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Belize due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Belize due to COVID-19.  

Travelers to Belize may experience border closures, airport closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within Belize due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Belize.

Violent crime – such as sexual assault, home invasions, armed robberies, and murder – are common even during daylight hours and in tourist areas. A significant portion of violent crime is gang-related. Due to high crime, travelers are advised to exercise caution while traveling to the south side of Belize City. Local police lack the resources and training to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents. Most crimes remain unresolved and unprosecuted.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Belize:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.   

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