January 24, 2022

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Austria National Day

16 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America and the American people, I offer best wishes to all Austrians on the 65th anniversary of your National Day.

Austria is an indispensable partner in advancing human rights, generating prosperity, and ensuring peace and security in Europe and around the world.  I witnessed your dedication to these shared values during my visit to Vienna in August when I met with President Van der Bellen, Chancellor Kurz and his ministers, and inaugurated one of the two U.S.-Austria Friendship Trams – a symbol of our lasting relationship.  Our two nations enjoy a long history of friendship and cooperation, which will continue to flourish as we together fight COVID-19 and confront new challenges.

As the people of Austria celebrate this anniversary, I congratulate you and look forward to expanding our ties and deepening our alliance.

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