January 27, 2022

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Attorney General Merrick B. Garland Restores the Office for Access to Justice

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<div>U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland today announced the restoration of a standalone Office for Access to Justice within the Justice Department dedicated to improving the federal government’s understanding of and capacity to address the most urgent legal needs of communities across America.</div>
U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland today announced the restoration of a standalone Office for Access to Justice within the Justice Department dedicated to improving the federal government’s understanding of and capacity to address the most urgent legal needs of communities across America.

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