January 23, 2022

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Attacks on Yemeni Officials in Aden

12 min read

Cale Brown, Principal Deputy Spokesperson

The United States strongly condemns the December 30 attacks in Aden that killed civilians and wounded many others.  We are deeply saddened by the loss of life and express our sympathies to the families of those killed.  The attacks were timed with the arrival of new Yemeni government officials and once again demonstrate the malicious intent of those trying to destabilize Yemen.  Such attacks will not stop or undermine efforts to bring a lasting peace that the Yemeni people deserve.  These violent acts must end, and the perpetrators must be brought to justice.  The United States supports the legitimate government of Yemen and stands with the people of Yemen as they work towards a better future for all Yemenis.

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