January 25, 2022

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Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs Bitter Travels to Guadalajara, Mexico City, and San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

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Office of the Spokesperson

Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs Rena Bitter will travel October 25-31 to Guadalajara, Mexico City, and San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.  In Guadalajara and San Miguel de Allende, she will observe consular operations and meet with staff.  In Mexico City, in addition to meeting with embassy staff, she will meet with host government officials in an annual bilateral consular dialogue to discuss topics of mutual interest and underscore our deep and sustained cooperation on a broad range of consular issues.  The U.S. Mission in Mexico is one of the largest consular operations in the world, supporting deep people-to-people and economic ties between the United States and Mexico

For press inquiries please contact CAPRESSREQUESTS@state.gov.

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