January 27, 2022

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Assistant Secretary for Global Public Affairs Allen’s Travel to Belgium

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Office of the Spokesperson

Assistant Secretary for Global Public Affairs Elizabeth Allen will travel to Brussels, Belgium November 8-10 to attend and speak at the annual NATO Information and Communicators’ Conference. She will meet with counterparts from NATO headquarters and Allied countries to discuss shared communications priorities leading up to the NATO Summit in Madrid in 2022.  Assistant Secretary Allen will also meet think tank, social media, and civil society leaders to discuss our common values and strengthen the transatlantic relationship.

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