December 9, 2021

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Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke Delivers Remarks at Unsung Heroes: A Civil Rights Division Celebration of Diverse Veterans

9 min read
<div>Thank you so much Louis, and good afternoon. It is an honor to be with you today at this important convening.</div>
Thank you so much Louis, and good afternoon. It is an honor to be with you today at this important convening.

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