January 23, 2022

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Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke Delivers Remarks at Dillard University’s 10th Annual Justice Revius O. Ortique Jr. Lecture on Law and Society

3 min read
<div>Thank you, President Kimbrough, for that kind introduction and the invitation to speak tonight.</div>
Thank you, President Kimbrough, for that kind introduction and the invitation to speak tonight.

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