December 3, 2021

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Assistant Attorney General Delrahim Delivers Remarks at the Antitrust Division’s Seventh Annual Diversity Celebration

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<div>Thank you, Matthew, for that kind introduction. And good afternoon everyone. It is great to be joined by so many colleagues from across the Antitrust Division and beyond.</div>

Thank you, Matthew, for that kind introduction.

And good afternoon everyone.  It is great to be joined by so many colleagues from across the Antitrust Division and beyond. 

I would also like to acknowledge our special guest from the FBI, Special Agent Voviette Morgan.  I’m honored to be introducing Ms. Morgan and grateful she accepted my invitation to this year’s Annual Diversity Celebration. 

This is my fourth Annual Diversity Celebration as Assistant Attorney General of the Antitrust Division.  In my tenure, we have had some incredibly inspiring speakers: former Treasurer of the United States Anna Cabral, former FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez, and former U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia Jessie Liu. This annual event complements the regular opportunities we have throughout the year to discuss diversity and inclusion with distinguished guests.  Some of those outstanding events included Roberta Cordano, the President of Gallaudet University; Leslie Overton, a former DAAG at the Division; and Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison of Johns Hopkins University. 

Before I hand things over to Special Agent Morgan, I’d like to pick up where Matthew left off and touch briefly on the Antitrust Division’s enduring commitment to diversity and inclusion.  When I rejoined the Division in 2017 as AAG, I pledged to build upon the Division’s robust support for diversity and inclusion to ensure a workplace tolerant and representative of a full diversity of ideas and backgrounds.  The Diversity Committee has helped ensure we honor that pledge, and I thank them for constantly bringing new ideas for furthering the Antitrust Division’s record as a place that welcomes diversity in all its forms. 

This has been an extraordinarily challenging year for all of us.  We’ve been trying to do our part to advance the Division’s mission while trying to stop the spread of coronavirus in our communities, homeschooling our kids, providing eldercare, and supporting our families and neighbors in countless other ways.  All of this against a backdrop of recent events in our country that strike at our collective conscience. 

I commend the Diversity Committee for juggling all of these challenges and yet remaining incredibly productive.  The Division remains a leader in advancing diversity within the Department because of this Committee’s innovation and sustained diligence.

Matthew spoke about some of the recent Diversity Committee initiatives.  I’ll note that several of these key recommendations are the work of the newest subcommittee, the Women’s subcommittee.  Launched in 2019, this subcommittee hit the ground running and has made an indelible impact on the Division with initiatives such as the Stork program, the Parental Leave Q&A, and the Wellness/Lactation Rooms, all initiatives I am proud to have worked with you on these past several years.   

Not to put too much pressure on the 2021 members of the Diversity Committee, but it is my hope that you will be just as successful as the 2020 and 2019 members have been.  Indeed, you’ll have an early opportunity to leave your mark on the Division as well with the creation of a new Subcommittee within the Diversity Committee – the Veterans Subcommittee.

This subcommittee will launch next year with a focus on increasing awareness of reservists’ and veterans’ valuable contributions to the Division’s mission, and addressing some of the issues unique to their circumstances, with the overarching goal of improving recruiting and retention of veterans and reservists. 

As you all know, in addition to recapping the Committee’s recent accomplishments, and previewing plans for the coming year, the Annual Celebration is also an opportunity to hear from a special guest speaker.

Today’s speaker is in the mold of the impressive leaders who have celebrated with us in past years: I could not be happier to introduce FBI Special Agent in Charge, Voviette Morgan.  

Special Agent Morgan is a trailblazing public servant that has inspired others to careers in public service and law enforcement.  A Los Angeles native, she joined the Bureau more than two decades ago focusing on white-collar crime.  She’s risen through the ranks and held several leadership positions in the Office of Public and Congressional Affairs and the Counterterrorism Division.  She has also served as the chief of the Internal Investigations Section in the Inspection Division at FBI Headquarters in Washington, D.C. 

In August 2017, FBI Director Christopher Wray named Special Agent Morgan as the Special Agent in Charge of the Criminal Division for the Los Angeles Field Office, which is responsible for investigating all federal crimes in the Los Angeles area.[1]  

Her office investigates everything from public corruption including police, law enforcement, legislative and judicial corruption, to organized crime and drug offenses, to a laundry list of white-collar crimes including antirust, financial institution and healthcare fraud.  Her office also investigates civil rights violations and human trafficking.  

We know just how busy Special Agent Morgan is and we very much appreciate her spending time with us this afternoon. 

From one Angeleno to another, I thank you, Voviette, for your tireless work protecting my beloved hometown.  It is my distinct privilege to welcome you to the Antitrust Division.

I now will hand things over to our moderator, Michelle, and thank you for being with us today.

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