January 25, 2022

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Armenian Independence Day

12 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I congratulate the people of Armenia as you celebrate Independence Day, in commemoration of your declaration of independence from the Soviet Union.  The United States is committed to continuing to build our bilateral partnership as we strengthen the ties between our people based on shared democratic values and a desire for peace and prosperity.

The United States welcomes Armenia’s continued commitment to strengthening the rule of law, establishing an independent judiciary, and increasing economic and investment opportunities.  We commend Armenia’s ongoing efforts to combat corruption through transparency, due process, and increased accountability to citizens, and we will continue to support you in these efforts.

We also remain committed to helping to find a peaceful resolution of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict and urge the sides to resume substantive negotiations under the auspices of the Minsk Group Co-Chairs as soon as possible.

Although COVID-19 has brought the world unique challenges this year, we are proud that our close cooperation in combating the pandemic has further strengthened the partnership between our peoples.

I wish the Armenian people a year of peace, freedom, and prosperity.

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