January 24, 2022

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Argentina Travel Advisory

5 min read

Do not travel to Argentina due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.    

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Argentina due to COVID-19.  

Travelers to Argentina may experience border closures, airport closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within Argentina due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Argentina.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Argentina:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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