December 3, 2021

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Archdiocese of New Orleans Agrees to Pay More Than $1 Million to Resolve Hurricane Katrina-related False Claims Act Allegations

23 min read
<div>The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans (Archdiocese of New Orleans) has agreed to pay more than $1 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by knowingly submitting false claims for payment to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the repair or replacement of certain facilities damaged by Hurricane Katrina. The settlement, which is based on the Archdiocese of New Orleans’ financial condition, required final approval of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, which approved the settlement on Oct. 26. </div>
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans (Archdiocese of New Orleans) has agreed to pay more than $1 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by knowingly submitting false claims for payment to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the repair or replacement of certain facilities damaged by Hurricane Katrina. The settlement, which is based on the Archdiocese of New Orleans’ financial condition, required final approval of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, which approved the settlement on Oct. 26. 

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