January 27, 2022

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Antigua and Barbuda’s National Day

11 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the government of the United States and the American people, I congratulate the people of Antigua and Barbuda on your 39th anniversary of independence.

As regional partners, our countries are working together to increase security, expand prosperity, and uphold democratic values.  We are proud of the U.S.-Caribbean Resilience Partnership that strengthens our preparedness for hurricanes and other natural disasters.  The United States’ and Antigua and Barbuda’s collaboration through the USAID Organization of Eastern Caribbean States Early Learners program has improved the literacy skills of more than 5,000 students.  Our work together against COVID-19 protects the health and well-being of our citizens.

Proud of what we have achieved together and looking forward to our continued partnership, I wish the people of Antigua and Barbuda a happy Independence Day.

 

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