January 19, 2022

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Antigua and Barbuda Travel Advisory

14 min read

Reconsider travel to Antigua and Barbuda due to health and safety measures and COVID-related conditions. Some areas have increased risk. Please read the entire Travel Advisory. 

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Antigua and Barbuda due to COVID-19.   

Antigua and Barbuda has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options, and businesses operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Antigua and Barbuda. 

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Antigua and Barbuda:

Barbuda

While Antigua received little damage during the 2017 hurricane season, Barbuda was seriously damaged. Infrastructure on Barbuda is still being rebuilt and there is power to fewer than half of the residences on the island.  

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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