December 5, 2021

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American Contractor Sentenced for Theft of Government Equipment on U.S. Military Base in Afghanistan

13 min read
<div>An American military contractor was sentenced today to 51 months in prison for her role in a theft ring on a military installation in Kandahar, Afghanistan.</div>
An American military contractor was sentenced today to 51 months in prison for her role in a theft ring on a military installation in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

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