January 20, 2022

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Albania National Day

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Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

As Albania celebrates its National Day, I extend congratulations on behalf of the United States Government and the American people.

This year, we also celebrate the European Union’s decision to open accession negotiations for Albania, a sign of the significant progress that Albania has made in implementing the reforms necessary for EU membership.  We commend Albania for its leadership as the 2020 OSCE chair and appreciate all that it has done to demonstrate its commitment to the Transatlantic community.  Albania plays a central role in helping ensure peace and stability as part of the NATO Alliance, and the United States stands by Albania as a steadfast Ally.

I wish safety and health to the Albanian people as we work together to overcome the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

 

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