January 22, 2022

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Acting Assistant Secretary Carol Thompson O’Connell Travel to Islamabad, Pakistan

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Office of the Spokesperson

From February 14-21, Acting Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration Carol Thompson O’Connell will travel to Islamabad, Pakistan as part of the U.S. delegation to the international conference to mark “40 Years of Afghan Refugees Presence in Pakistan:  A New Partnership for Solidarity” taking place February 17-18.  Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad and Deputy Assistant Secretary Nancy Izzo Jackson with the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs will also join the delegation.

Acting Assistant Secretary of State O’Connell will recognize Pakistan’s role in hosting millions of Afghan refugees fleeing violence and persecution in their home country over the past 40 years, underscore America’s leadership and commitment to assisting refugees and displaced persons in the region, and recognize the role of international organization and non-governmental organization partners in providing critical humanitarian aid to those in need.  She will also meet with foreign government officials, as well as international and non-governmental partners.

For further information about America’s lifesaving work with refugees around the world, please contact PRMPress@state.gov, and follow @StatePRM on Twitter and @State.PRM on Facebook.

 

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