December 4, 2021

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65th Anniversary of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution

17 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

On the sixty-fifth anniversary of the 1956 Hungarian revolution, we remember the brave men and women who fought to defend their liberty on the streets of Budapest and around the nation.  Their passion for freedom was realized in 1989, when Hungary embraced democracy.  We mark this solemn anniversary together with our partner and NATO Ally.

We recognize the contributions of Hungarians who fled their homeland after the revolution to build new lives in America, enriching our country in the process.  These Hungarian-Americans, and many before and since, have strengthened the connections between our two nations.

As we mark the one hundredth anniversary of diplomatic relations between Hungary and the United States this year, moments like the 1956 revolution stand out for their clarity and impact.  The revolutionaries of 1956 still inspire those who hold freedom dear.

 

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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