January 25, 2022

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2021 Nutrition for Growth Summit

17 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The Nutrition for Growth (N4G) Summit, hosted today by the Government of Japan, represents a critical milestone to address malnutrition in all its forms around the world. Building off the efforts and substantial commitments the United States made at the 2021 United Nations Food Systems Summit, we intend to invest up to $11 billion over three years, subject to Congressional appropriations, to combat global malnutrition, the underlying cause of almost half of childhood deaths globally. This financial commitment goes along with a robust set of policy and programmatic commitments to protect and improve global nutrition. The United States also reaffirmed its historic leadership on nutrition with the recent launch of the second U.S. government Global Nutrition Coordination Plan.

Good nutrition is both essential to safeguarding children’s lives and their ability to achieve their full physical and intellectual potential. It is also fundamental to broader economic development, security, and prosperity.  Beyond that, it is a moral imperative. We will work to see to it that global crises, including COVID-19 and the climate crisis, do not worsen the global nutrition situation and that negative trends in malnutrition are reversed. Together with partners around the world, we are proud to advance these efforts at the N4G Summit.

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