January 19, 2022

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2020 U.S.-Vietnam Human Rights Dialogue

6 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The 24th Annual U.S.-Vietnam Human Rights Dialogue was held on October 6, 2020 via virtual sessions.  Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs Ambassador Atul Keshap welcomed the Vietnamese delegation to the Dialogue, highlighting the strong ties between our two countries as we celebrate the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations.

Acting Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Scott Busby and Vietnam’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs Department of International Organizations Director General Do Hung Viet led their respective delegations.  U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam Daniel Kritenbrink and Ambassador Ha Kim Ngoc of the Embassy of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam in Washington, DC also provided opening remarks.

The three-hour Dialogue addressed a wide range of human rights issues, including the importance of continued progress and bilateral cooperation on the rule of law, freedom of expression and association, religious freedom, and labor rights.  The Dialogue also covered the rights of vulnerable populations, such as ethnic minority groups and persons with disabilities.

The promotion of human rights and fundamental freedoms remains a critical pillar of U.S. foreign policy and is key to further building upon the U.S.-Vietnam Comprehensive Partnership.

For further information, please contact DRL-Press@state.gov.

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